Roberta Einer

 

 

How would you define your relation with colour?

It’s really strange, but few years ago I never designed anything in colour! I saw everything in black, white and nude and concentrated on the texture and quality. Over the years all I have had chance to work with many amazing designers, who all worked around colour, print and embroidery, which had a massive impact on my own work. Especially influential was my time in Balmain, I think. Now I am not that precious with colour (as you can see!) and I am all about having fun with it and going with combinations that feel right at the time.

 

How was your first approach towards fashion?

I spent a lot of time in my childhood traveling with my parents when they visited leather and accessories fairs in Italy for their business, so fashion and beauty has always had an important place in my life. When I was 11 I made my first dress, when I was 12 I entered my first kids fashion competition, by the age of 15 I decided to move to the UK to study art and design more in-depth and I have been here since then!

 

What’s your perception towards experimenting?

I am all for experimenting. I always work with materials that excite me the most and try different things out with them. That could be electrical wires, ribbons, clay or anything else really. After creating something with that I start thinking how I can adapt it into a textile or a piece of clothing.

 
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When I look at your latest collection it makes me think about the ocean and mermaids, is there a feeling of fantasy in your work?

Yes, absolutely. I think high fashion should be about creating and selling a dream- a better, happier, more beautiful world. Before I start doing any design work I create collages, write and draw to create a story that I want to tell through my work and that inspires me.

 

What do you intend to communicate through your latest collection?

This collection is all about the naive youth and the beauty and irony of it all together-Pop culture, first love, high school hierarchies, good girls and bad boys. I think fashion should be fun, enjoyable and carefree, because at the end of the day it’s just clothes, isn’t it?

 

If you could translate the concept of your work through music how would it sound like?

Oh I think it’s different every time. What I listen daily depends on my mood, but what I choose for my show music or a video soundtrack could be something that it’s not my taste usually, but I choose it because it creates a perfect atmosphere and a “world” around the clothes. One perfects the other. 

 

 

How would you describe the person who wears your clothes?

My ideal woman has a young soul and a brave heart. It’s somebody who wants to be surrounded by beauty and appreciates it in every form: art, music, design, and clothing. I think you have to be quite a character and you have to be confident in your own body, to pull my designs off without clothes shading the wearer with all that colour, texture, print and bling!

 

Do you consider yourself an artist?

Definitely. I see an artist as a creative soul seeking ways to express itself in every form. For me it’s all about clothes.

 

3 upcoming designers we should know about.

Niall Cottrell, Mimi Wade, Hannah Williams are some of my favourite young graduates from 2015.

 

3 influencers who changed fashion forever.

Gianni Versace, Yves Saint Laurent and Coco Chanel - cliché but true.

 

 

Could you tell us a little about your personality? Does it reflect in your work?

I draw graphic designs for embroideries inspired by my mood, weird things that I happened to be, any issues I might be having and I always try to squeeze in some symbols into the graphics that mean something to me or are an inside joke with my friends. People who know me tend to say that my work is reflection of what I am going through at the moment and reflecti

I draw graphic designs for embroideries inspired by my mood, weird things that I happened to be, any issues I might be having and I always try to squeeze in some symbols into the graphics that mean something to me or are an inside joke with my friends. People who know me tend to say that my work is a reflection of what I am going through at the moment and a reflection of me, so I guess my personality does reflect in some ways in my work too. I have quite a dark humour and I love a good laugh, so it’s easy to understand why my work sometimes might have a little naive-cheeky-bittersweet-ironical vibe to it.

on of me, so I guess my personality does reflect in some ways in my work too. I have quite a dark humour and I love a good laugh, so it’s easy to understand why my work sometimes might have a little naive-cheeky-bittersweet-ironical vibe to it.

 

How does nature speak to you?

I love being outdoors in the nature, it really clears my head from all useless things and fills my head with new ideas. So lying in a park or running around London at midnight could be either calming or insanely inspiring and it always feels great.

 

Do you think that young people have more of a voice now than before?

I think we have much more options to express ourselves. The weight of social media is huge, it has given a whole new platform for young people to go out, do their thing and get heard. I think that’s really great.

 

What do you hope your audience takes away from seeing your collection?

At the end of the day, I just want to create something beautiful, something that makes people dream and wonder. Something that makes people happy when seeing it or wearing it. 

 

 

What motivates you?

The idea of being a better person and a better designer than I was the day before. Creating, dreaming and never growing up.

 

How has British culture influenced you and your vision as a designer?

When I moved to the UK for boarding school, I got straight into very old-school British environment which I loved and after that I dived into East-London craziness, which was a complete opposite of what I had previously seen. My school years helped to develop such a strong work-mentality and living in a vibrant east London just made me really fearless I think.

 

Do you think that traveling and meeting new cultures is important to the development of your work?

Broadening the way we see things and constantly learning about new cultures, places and history is so important when the goal is to create something new. It is of vital importance to travel and wonder to get inspired, because I think too many creatives just surf the internet for inspiration and this way we end up getting too many designers who’s things look just way too similar.

 

What’s your opinion when it comes to excesses?

Ha! Too much is never enough. But only in moderation!

 

What does it takes to make it into the fashion industry?

Work hard, believe in yourself, be insanely stubborn, make sure you have a lot of talent and have fingers crossed you have even more luck!